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Malik el Sami: "You shut yourself in the Shattered Keep—"

Cyric: "Castle of the Supreme Throne!"
Malik: "—and delude yourself into believing you play other gods like puppets.

  — Exchange between Malik and Cyric in a farm near Candlekeep[8]

The Supreme Throne was a Fiendish plane in the World Tree cosmology[9] and an Astral dominion in the World Axis cosmology.[3] Its only standing structure, the Shattered Castle, also known as the Shattered Keep and the Castle of the Supreme Throne, was the divine realm of Cyric, the Prince of Lies.[1][2][4] Following the murder of the Goddess of Magic, Mystra, the realm also became Cyric's prison, by the hands of fellow gods Lathander, Tyr, and Sune.[3][7][10]

CosmologyEdit

According to the Great Wheel cosmology, the Shattered Castle was a realm within Cocytus, the second layer of Pandemonium,[1][2] after Cyric retreated from his previous realm of Bone Castle in Hades.[11][12]

GeographyEdit

Much like the rest of Cocytus,[6][13] the Supreme Throne was a barren realm where howling winds could drive mortals mad.[4] Because Cyric was the enemy of all other faiths, the followers of any deity besides Cyric found their spells more difficult to cast on the plane.[4]

The Shattered Castle was a twisted and ruined fortress that first served as Cyric's seat of power,[4][11] and as his prison afterwards.[3] It was called the "Castle of the Supreme Throne" only by Cyric himself.[1][2]

HistoryEdit

According to a thrall captured by mind flayers of Oryndoll beneath Andalbruin, the Supreme Throne was originally established as a kingdom in the plane of Limbo by batrachi who had left Toril after around −31500 DR. There, the deity called Ramenos once again changed the batrachi to serve his goals.[14]

The Shattered Castle was then moved by Cyric[4] and brought to Pandemonium as he retreated to that plane after reading the Cyrinishad in the Year of the Banner, 1368 DR.[1][11][15] Cyric, driven mad, abandoned Bone Castle in Hades and established his new realm in Cocytus as a twisted, ever-changing fortress, which served as his base from where he hatched his plans to conquer Toril.[2][11]

In the Year of Blue Fire, 1385 DR, after Cyric murdered Mystra and triggered the Spellplague, Lathander, Sune, and Tyr decreed that Cyric be imprisoned in the Supreme Throne for 1000 years.[16]

InhabitantsEdit

The Supreme Throne was the home plane of chaos beasts, demodands, howlers, and slaadi.[4] It was also home to howling dragons and chaos dragons.[17]

Since its inception in Limbo, the realm was inhabited by batrachi.[14] Among them was Bazim-Gorag, the Firebringer.[18]

Rumors & LegendsEdit

A rumor existed that seven black iron keys were required to free Cyric from his shackles within his prison.[19]

AppendixEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 Colin McComb (1996). On Hallowed Ground. Edited by Ray Vallese. (TSR, Inc), p. 168. ISBN 0-7869-0430-5.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 Julia Martin, Eric L. Boyd (March 1996). Faiths & Avatars. (TSR, Inc), p. 51. ISBN 978-0786903849.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 64–65. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 163. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  5. Monte Cook, Jonathan Tweet, Skip Williams (July 2003). Dungeon Master's Guide 3.5 edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 159. ISBN 0-7869-2889-1.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Jeff Grubb, Bruce R. Cordell, David Noonan (September 2001). Manual of the Planes 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 97–99. ISBN 0-7869-1850-8.
  7. 7.0 7.1 Rob Heinsoo, Logan Bonner, Robert J. Schwalb (September 2008). Forgotten Realms Player's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 159. ISBN 978-0-7869-4929-8.
  8. Troy Denning (February 1998). Crucible: The Trial of Cyric the Mad. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 149–150. ISBN 0-7869-0724-X.
  9. Richard Baker, James Wyatt (March 2004). Player's Guide to Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 140. ISBN 0-7869-3134-5.
  10. Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 74. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 Kevin Melka and John Terra (April 1995). Ruins of Zhentil Keep (Campaign Book). (TSR, Inc), pp. 113–114. ISBN 0-7869-0109-8.
  12. Jeff Grubb and Ed Greenwood (1990). Forgotten Realms Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 17. ISBN 0-8803-8828-5.
  13. Wolfgang Baur and Lester Smith (1994-07-01). “The Book of Chaos”. In Michele Carter ed. Planes of Chaos (TSR, Inc), p. 95. ISBN 1560768746.
  14. 14.0 14.1 Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 5. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  15. Kevin Melka and John Terra (April 1995). Ruins of Zhentil Keep (Campaign Book). (TSR, Inc), pp. 24–26. ISBN 0-7869-0109-8.
  16. Brian R. James and Ed Greenwood (September, 2007). The Grand History of the Realms. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 159. ISBN 978-0-7869-4731-7.
  17. Eric L. Boyd, Eytan Bernstein (August 2006). Dragons of Faerûn. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 11. ISBN 0-7869-3923-0.
  18. Jeff Crook, Wil Upchurch, Eric L. Boyd (May 2005). Champions of Ruin. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 152. ISBN 0-7869-3692-4.
  19. Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 45. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.

ConnectionsEdit

The Ever-Changing Chaos of Limbo
Layers and Realms



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