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Tabards were widely used throughout Faerûn.[1]

DescriptionEdit

Tabards were a simple, yet effective garment to identify armies and personal guards. They were typically adorned with the family's or city's colors and insignia.[1]

HistoryEdit

Aurora's Emporium offered tabards in large quantities, made of linen imported from Daerlun and dyed with pigments imported from Baldur's Gate. Prices per individual piece varied depending on the amount ordered, ranging from 6 sp for orders of fewer than twenty units to 3 sp for orders larger than 200.[1]

ReputationEdit

Tabards produced by Aurora's Emporium were said to be well known and appreciated in Elturel, Selgaunt, and Waterdeep.[1]

Notable TabardsEdit

Notable OwnersEdit

City Guardsmen-Vinod Rams

The City Guard's standard uniform: black, gold-trimmed tabard over armor.

GroupsEdit

  • The standard uniform of the City Guard of Waterdeep in the mid‒14th century DR included a black tabard with golden trim over armor.[4][5]
  • Members of the Purple Dragons were known to wear tabards emblazoned with their organization's symbol.[6]

ReligionsEdit

  • The clergy of Arvoreen often wore dark blue tabards with the god's holy symbol emblazoned on it in silver.[7]
  • The clergy of Clangeddin Silverbeard often wore silver tabards emblazoned with his holy symbol.[8]
  • Cyric-Swords were known to wear purple tabards with the holy symbol of Cyric embroidered on the chest.[9]
  • The clergy of Ghaunadaur often wore dark tabards emblazoned with his holy symbol.[10]
  • Helm-Questers were known to wear tabards of a golden hue, with the holy symbol of Helm emblazoned on the chest.[11]
  • Tyr-Hands were known to wear white and gold tabards with the holy symbol of Tyr embroidered on the chest in gold.[12]

AppendixEdit

External LinksEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Jeff Grubb, Julia Martin, Steven E. Schend et al (1992). Aurora's Whole Realms Catalogue. (TSR, Inc), pp. 85–86. ISBN 0-5607-6327-2.
  2. Eric Cagle, Jesse Decker, Jeff Quick, and James Wyatt (March 2003). Arms and Equipment Guide 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 29. ISBN 978-0-7869-2649-7.
  3. Ed Greenwood, Steve Perrin (1988). The Magister (sourcebook). (TSR, Inc), p. 38. ISBN 0-88038-564-2.
  4. Ed Greenwood and Steven E. Schend (July 1994). “Campaign Guide”. City of Splendors (TSR, Inc), p. 76. ISBN 0-5607-6868-1.
  5. Eric L. Boyd (June 2005). City of Splendors: Waterdeep. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 34. ISBN 0-7869-3693-2.
  6. John Terra (February 1996). Warriors and Priests of the Realms. Edited by Steven E. Schend. (TSR, Inc), p. 21. ISBN 0-7869-0368-6.
  7. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 164. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  8. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 52. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  9. John Terra (February 1996). Warriors and Priests of the Realms. Edited by Steven E. Schend. (TSR, Inc), p. 74. ISBN 0-7869-0368-6.
  10. Eric L. Boyd (1998). Demihuman Deities. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 21. ISBN 0-7869-1239-1.
  11. John Terra (February 1996). Warriors and Priests of the Realms. Edited by Steven E. Schend. (TSR, Inc), p. 79. ISBN 0-7869-0368-6.
  12. John Terra (February 1996). Warriors and Priests of the Realms. Edited by Steven E. Schend. (TSR, Inc), p. 118. ISBN 0-7869-0368-6.
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