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Tasha's hideous laughter, also known as Tasha's uncontrollable hideous laughter,[3] was an enchantment spell that caused its target to fall into crippling bouts of laughter.[1]

EffectsEdit

The target of Tasha's hideous laughter perceived everything as extremely funny and laughed so uncontrollably that it became impossible to even stand up. The effect of the spell lasted for up to one minute, as long as the spellcaster kept concentrating on the spell or until the target managed to shake off the effect. Ending the spell's effect was also easier if the target was injured in any way.[1]

ComponentsEdit

The spell required verbal, somatic, and material components. The materials required were a small feather that needed to be waved in the air and tiny tarts that needed to be thrown in the target's direction.[1][2]

HistoryEdit

The spell was attributed to the Oerthian archmage Iggwilv, during an early time in her career when she was known as Tasha.[6]

By the 1360s DR it was yet rarely found in the magical communities of both Faerûn[7] and Zakhara.[note 1] To Zakharans, always reluctant to acknowledge ajami names and accomplishments, the spell was known as uncontrollable hideous laughter, and counted among the spells of the universal province.[5]

By the late 15th century DR, the spell was commonly used throughout Waterdeep as a security measure against burglars, usually coupled with a glyph of warding cast on rooftops.[8]

The spell was commonly employed by nilbogs. It was also known to some cloud giant spellcasters[9] and could be innately cast by powerful eladrin who resided in the Feywild.[10]

Additionally, Tasha's hideous laughter was favored by cultists of Yeenoghu and was considered a signature spell of his followers.[11]

AppendixEdit

NotesEdit

  1. Canon material does not provide dating for the Al-Qadim campaign setting. For the purposes of this wiki only, the current date for Al-Qadim products is assumed to be 1367 DR.

AppearancesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Mike Mearls, Jeremy Crawford (2014). Player's Handbook 5th edition. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 10, 207, 210, 280. ISBN 978-0-7869-6560-1.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook, Skip Williams (July 2003). Player's Handbook 3.5 edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 292. ISBN 0-7869-2886-7.
  3. 3.0 3.1 David "Zeb" Cook (August 1989). Player's Handbook (2nd edition). (TSR, Inc.), p. 146. ISBN 0-88038-716-5.
  4. Richard Baker (1996). Player's Option: Spells & Magic. (TSR, Inc), pp. 181–182, 185. ISBN 0-7869-0394-5.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Sam Witt (January 1994). The Complete Sha'ir's Handbook. (TSR, Inc), p. 124. ISBN 978-1560768289.
  6. Dungeons & Dragons editors (September 2007). “Unsolved Mysteries of D&D”. In Erik Mona ed. Dragon #359 (Paizo Publishing, LLC), p. 30.
  7. Jeff Grubb and Ed Greenwood (1990). Forgotten Realms Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 152. ISBN 0-8803-8828-5.
  8. Christopher Perkins, James Haeck, James Introcaso, Adam Lee, Matthew Sernett (September 2018). Waterdeep: Dragon Heist. Edited by Jeremy Crawford. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 72. ISBN 978-0-7869-6625-7.
  9. Wizards RPG Team (2016). Volo's Guide to Monsters. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 146, 182. ISBN 978-0786966011.
  10. Mike Mearls, Jeremy Crawford (May 29, 2018). Mordenkainen's Tome of Foes. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 196. ISBN 978-0786966240.
  11. Mike Mearls, Jeremy Crawford (May 29, 2018). Mordenkainen's Tome of Foes. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 31. ISBN 978-0786966240.