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Topaz dragons were selfish and had an erratic personality which made them dangerous to deal with. Topaz dragons were most commonly found in the Elemental Chaos but sometimes live in lairs on secluded beaches on the Prime Material Plane.[2]

CombatEdit

Topaz dragons breathed a cone of dehydration.[7]

Notable Topaz DragonsEdit

AppendixEdit

NotesEdit

  1. Tyrangal, also known as Gaulauntyr, is described as a topaz dragon in her first appearance, the article "Wyrms of the North: The Thief Dragon" in Dragon #240 (p. 77–81). Subsequent appearances in the 3rd edition Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting (p. 220) and the novel The Edge of Chaos describe her as a copper dragon. Gaulauntyr's entry in Dragons of Faerûn (p. 150) lists her as "topaz (copper)", presumably to avoid arbitrating the conflict. As Gaulauntyr was known to disguise herself using illusions, it is possible the early topaz dragon appearance can be attributed to that. For the purposes of this wiki, Tyrangal/Gaulauntyr is considered to be a copper dragon in accordance with our canon policy.

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Doug Stewart (June 1993). Monstrous Manual. (TSR, Inc), p. 74. ISBN 1-5607-6619-0.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Ed Bonny, Jeff Grubb, Rich Redman, Skip Williams, and Steve Winter (September 2002). Monster Manual II 3rd edition. (TSR, Inc), pp. 85–86. ISBN 07-8692-873-5.
  3. Andy Collins, James Wyatt, and Skip Williams (November 2003). Draconomicon: The Book of Dragons. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 288. ISBN 0-7869-2884-0.
  4. Bruce R. Cordell (April 2004). Expanded Psionics Handbook. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 183. ISBN 0-7869-3301-1.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Arthur W. Collins (May 1980). “That's not in the Monster Manual!”. In Jake Jaquet ed. Dragon #37 (TSR, Inc.), pp. 6–7, 35–36.
  6. Scott Brocius & Mark A. Jindra (2003-01-24). The Legend of Sardior. The Mind's Eye. Wizards of the Coast. Retrieved on 2019-05-07.
  7. Ed Bonny, Jeff Grubb, Rich Redman, Skip Williams, and Steve Winter (September 2002). Monster Manual II 3rd edition. (TSR, Inc), p. 87. ISBN 07-8692-873-5.


ConnectionsEdit

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