FANDOM


Triboar (pronounced: /ˈtrbɔːrTRY-bore[7]), nicknamed the Town Where Only Gwaeron Sleeps,[8] was a trading settlement found in the North. It was a lively crossroads town full of the hustle and bustle of roaming merchants, caravaneers and other travelers.[2]

Triboar was full of activity all day and night.[8] It was commonly used as a meeting point for a number of armies and militaries that banded together when threats appeared in the North.[3]

GeographyEdit

Triboar was nestled in the Dessarin Valley, where the Evermoor Way intersected with the Long Road.[1][2]

As a crossroads town, it was centrally located amidst a number of prominent settlements. Triboar was located about 225 miles (362.1 kilometers) east of Phandalin, if traveling along the Triboar Trail;[9] 60 miles (95.6 kilometers) west of Yartar, as traveled along the Evermoor Way; 80 miles (128.7 kilometers) north of Westbridge,[10] and 200 miles (321.9 kilometers) north of Red Larch, by way of the Long Road.[9]

Geographical FeaturesEdit

The landscape surrounding the town was lush and well-suited for farming.[1]

GovernmentEdit

The town was ruled by a democratically-elected lord protector. His or her task was to command the town's militia and to settle disputes. The town's legal system was called the "Lord's Decrees" and the lord protector had the power to amend this system at will.[4]

Faurael Blackhammer served as lord protector during the 14th century DR, until he was killed in the Year of the Gauntlet, 1369 DR fighting the tanar'ri forces that emerged from Hellgate Keep.[11]

As of the Year of the Scarlet Witch, 1491 DR, the lord protector was a Harper by the name of Darathra Shendrel.[2][6]

RelationsEdit

Although the rivalry between Triboar and the neighboring Yartar was usually friendly, there were occasions when it erupted into violence over a particular incident.[12] The rivalry began when each town condemned the other for the fate of the Lost Guide, a caravan-driver who disappeared while transporting a shipment of gold between the two settlements.[13]

TradeEdit

Mountain ponies and other horses were sold in Triboar, along with harnesses and wagons.[1][3] It featured a vast marketplace where local farmers, ranchers and roadside salespeople offered their wares.[2]

Triboar was home to a number of guides, all of whom were knowledgeable about destinations anywhere in the North. While they offered their services for a few mere gold pieces, excluding the cost of food, they required a deposit that covered over a tenday's time. Noted guides of the mid—14th century DR included Borth Jhandelspar, Ilrin Sharadin, Morth Fartheen and Zandever Eyredanus.[1]

DefensesEdit

The town operated a defense force called The Twelve, which consisted of this many mounted patrols that rotated in a tenday cycle.[2] As of the mid-14th century DR, the town could rally together a well-armed militia of fifty rapidly and three hundred in a day.[1][3]

HistoryEdit

Millennia before the Era of Upheaval, the giants and dragons of the North fought a great battle on the land upon which Triboar would be built. The giant-crafted relic known as the Vonindod was used during this conflict.[14]

Triboar, along with Red Larch, were some of the first settlements that were founded in the Dessarin Valley, after the the city of Waterdeep grew to prominence around the Year of the Wailing Winds, 1000 DR.[15] Over the centuries, it was the assembly point for human armies in response to the orc hordes from the mountains in the north along the Surbrin.[1]

In Year of the Scarlet Witch, 1491 DR, the Zhentarim-protected caravan en route to Triboar was attacked by members of the Cult of the Howling Hatred. Aboard one of the wagons was Ascaleld Marurryn, a representative of the Rolling Wheel merchant coster.[16][17]

Triboar attack-5e

An orc riding down a citizen of Triboar.

Some time after the War of the Silver Marches, the town was assaulted by a force of fire giants, orogs and axe beak-mounted orcs.[14]

During a Greengrass festival in the late 15th century DR, Triboar was assaulted by a group of githyanki that landed in the village with their astral brig. The true reason for their sudden appearance was to deal with an elder brain that lived underneath the village. Both the githyanki and the illithid were ultimately defeated by a group of adventurers.[18]

Rumors & LegendsEdit

The town's name was thought to reflect the 11th tale of a traveler who killed three boars on the same day. The lord protector's banner consisted of three black boars on a red background.[1][2]

It was said that the god of rangers, Gwaeron Windstrom, was laid to rest in Triboar.[1] The grove of trees that marked this spot was free of any shrine, but was protected by local laws forbidding its disturbance.[13]

Notable LocationsEdit

Shops
Restaurants & Taverns
Inns
Landmarks
Residences

InhabitantsEdit

As of the mid-14th century DR, Triboar was a large town with a population of around 2500 individuals.[1] Over half of the residents lived in the farms and ranches located beyond the town proper.[2]

AppendixEdit

AppearancesEdit

Adventures

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 Ed Greenwood (1993). Volo's Guide to the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 82. ISBN 1-5607-6678-6.
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 53. ISBN 978-0786966004.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 slade (April 1996). The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier (Cities and Civilization). (TSR, Inc), p. 36. ISBN 0-7869-0391-0.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Ed Greenwood (1993). Volo's Guide to the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 83. ISBN 1-5607-6678-6.
  5. >Eric L. Boyd (June 2005). City of Splendors: Waterdeep. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 15. ISBN 0-7869-3693-2.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Michele Carter, Stacy Janssen eds. (2015). Princes of the Apocalypse. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 37. ISBN 978-0786965786.
  7. Jennell Jaquays (as Paul Jaquays) (1988). The Savage Frontier. (TSR, Inc), p. 33. ISBN 0-88038-593-6.
  8. 8.0 8.1 Ed Greenwood (1993). Volo's Guide to the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 85. ISBN 1-5607-6678-6.
  9. 9.0 9.1 Michele Carter, Stacy Janssen eds. (2015). Princes of the Apocalypse. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 17. ISBN 978-0786965786.
  10. Michele Carter, Stacy Janssen eds. (2015). Princes of the Apocalypse. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 182. ISBN 978-0786965786.
  11. Dale Henson (as slade), Ed Greenwood, Julia Martin, Steven E. Schend, Jennell Jaquays (as Paul Jaquays), Steve Perrin (April 1996). The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier (The Wilderness). (TSR, Inc), p. 12. ISBN 0-7869-0391-0.
  12. Ed Greenwood (1993). Volo's Guide to the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 84. ISBN 1-5607-6678-6.
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 13.3 13.4 13.5 13.6 13.7 13.8 slade (April 1996). The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier (Cities and Civilization). (TSR, Inc), p. 37. ISBN 0-7869-0391-0.
  14. 14.0 14.1 Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 59. ISBN 978-0786966004.
  15. Michele Carter, Stacy Janssen eds. (2015). Princes of the Apocalypse. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 19. ISBN 978-0786965786.
  16. Michele Carter, Stacy Janssen eds. (2015). Princes of the Apocalypse. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 166. ISBN 978-0786965786.
  17. Michele Carter, Stacy Janssen eds. (2015). Princes of the Apocalypse. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 167. ISBN 978-0786965786.
  18. Codename Entertainment (September 2017). Idle Champions of the Forgotten Realms. Codename Entertainment.
  19. 19.0 19.1 19.2 19.3 Ed Greenwood (1993). Volo's Guide to the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 86. ISBN 1-5607-6678-6.
  20. 20.0 20.1 20.2 20.3 20.4 20.5 Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 54. ISBN 978-0786966004.
  21. 21.0 21.1 21.2 21.3 21.4 21.5 21.6 Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 57. ISBN 978-0786966004.
  22. 22.0 22.1 22.2 22.3 Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 56. ISBN 978-0786966004.
  23. 23.0 23.1 slade (April 1996). The North: Guide to the Savage Frontier (Cities and Civilization). (TSR, Inc), p. 38. ISBN 0-7869-0391-0.
  24. 24.0 24.1 24.2 24.3 24.4 24.5 Ed Greenwood (1993). Volo's Guide to the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 88. ISBN 1-5607-6678-6.
  25. 25.0 25.1 Christopher Perkins (September 6, 2016). Storm King's Thunder. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 58. ISBN 978-0786966004.
  26. Ed Greenwood (1993). Volo's Guide to the North. (TSR, Inc), p. 87. ISBN 1-5607-6678-6.
Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.