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Tu'narath was a githyanki city in the Astral Plane that was built upon the body of a long dead six-armed deity.[2] The githyanki scorned religion, so did not care about this, and settled here for convenience.[1]

GeographyEdit

The city of Tu'narath was a floating mass surrounded by stony motes and drifting bergs. The buildings of the city occupied the entire surface, even underneath. Streets littered the cities, full to the brim with merchant stands, fortresses, and tall towers.[1]

Tu'narath had six large constructed arms, each of which acted as a docking station.[1]

HistoryEdit

Tu'narath was built on top of the corpse of a long-dead deity referred to by Vlaakith as "The One in the Void". This deity was believed to have been dead since long before Gith had freed the gith race from the mind flayers. However, even millennia after its demise, the deity was thought to still possess some spark of divinity. This thought was mostly due to the occasional earthquakes that occurred throughout the city.[2][4]

In the late 15th century DR, groups of Red Wizards of Thay ventured into the underground dungeons of Tu'narath in search of artifacts and remains of The One in the Void, escorted by githyanki knights. In one of those expeditions, the wizards retrieved a large adamantine container that pulsed and resounded as if it contained a large beating heart.[2]

Rumors & LegendsEdit

It was rumored that the underground of Tu'narath contained a hidden fortress, inhabited by an unknown demigod who dwelt in the corpse of The One in the Void since before the arrival of the githyanki.[2]

AppendixEdit

AppearancesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 Robert J. Schwalb (July 2009). “Tu’narath City of Death”. In Chris Youngs ed. Dragon #377 (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 16–28.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 Mike Mearls, Jeremy Crawford (May 29, 2018). Mordenkainen's Tome of Foes. Edited by Kim Mohan, Michele Carter. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 91–92. ISBN 978-0786966240.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Christopher Perkins (July 2003). “The Lich-Queen's Beloved”. In Chris Thomasson ed. Dungeon #100 (Paizo Publishing), pp. 101–102.
  4. Christopher Perkins (July 2003). “The Lich-Queen's Beloved”. In Chris Thomasson ed. Dungeon #100 (Paizo Publishing), p. 98.

ConnectionsEdit




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