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Water elementals were elemental creatures of water.[5]

DescriptionEdit

These elementals typically resembled a cresting wave of water. They could easily disappear within a body of water, becoming indistinguishable from all other liquid.[7]

PersonalityEdit

These beings were not especially intelligent.[6] However, like all elementals, they instinctively resented any creature that conjured them from their home plane and bound them into its service.[7]

BiologyEdit

Being elementals, these creatures did not require any air, food, drink, or sleep to survive.[7]

AbilitiesEdit

Due to being composed of water, these elementals could effortlessly move through spaces as small as 1 inch (0.025 meters). However, cold-based spells considerably restrained their movement.[2]

Prior to the Time of Troubles, water elementals were only capable of straying 6 feet (1.8 meters) away from their element.[6] Following this period and prior to the Spellplague, they were only capable of moving 180 feet (55 meters) from the body of water in which they were originally conjured.[5] Following the events of the Second Sundering, there were no longer any limits on how far water elementals could stray from bodies of water.[2]

Acid, as well as bludgeoning and piercing weaponry, was ineffective against water elementals. They could only be harmed by weaponry that was enchanted.[2] Prior to the Time of Troubles, they could only be damaged by weapons with a +2 enchantment or greater.[6]

CombatEdit

Water elementals preferred to fight in bodies of water. They were capable of capsizing small boats and could impede the progress of larger craft.[8][6] Outside of water they were slower and less effective combatants.[6]

Water elementals would often attempt to grapple a larger creature or multiple smaller ones, restraining them within their watery body in an attempt to drown the victim(s).[2][7] When not attempting this, water elementals would simply slam their bodies against opponents.[2]

HistoryEdit

Water elementals were used in the Great Forge of Gauntlgrym to help contain the fire primordial Maegera.[9]

Lucan Greenharrow used water elementals to power traps in the Waterclock Crypts of Neverwinter.[10]

SocietyEdit

HomelandsEdit

These beings were native to the Elemental Plane of Water.[6]

SummoningEdit

Prior to the Time of Troubles, a pool of water that was at least 1,000 cubic feet (28 cubic meters) in volume was required to summon a water elemental to the Prime Material plane, but several barrels of ale or wine would also suffice.[6]

Following this period, more effective means for summoning water elementals were available. These included the spells elemental summoning[11] and conjure water elemental.[12] There were also magical items that could achieve this, such as as a bowl of commanding water elementals and elemental gems.[13]

LanguagesEdit

Water elementals spoke Aquan, although they rarely chose to speak.[5][2]

RelationshipsEdit

Water elementals were favored monsters of the deities Deep Sashelas, Istishia, and Auril. Because of this, they would often act as servitors of these deities and their worshipers.[14]

Water elementals were often summoned by krakens to defend their lairs.[15]

AppendixEdit

AppearancesEdit

Board Games
The Legend of Drizzt Board GameTemple of Elemental Evil Board Game
Card Games
AD&D Trading CardsDragonfire (Moonshae Storms, Sea of Swords)
Novels
ArchmageNight of the Hunter[16]Tangled Webs[17]
Video games
Baldur's Gate II: Throne of BhaalDungeon HackIcewind DaleNeverwinter NightsNeverwinter Nights 2
Referenced only
Baldur's Gate

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Skip Williams, Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook (July 2003). Monster Manual v.3.5. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 98, 100. ISBN 0-7869-2893-X.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 Wizards RPG Team (2014). Monster Manual 5th edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 125. ISBN 978-0786965614.
  3. Mike Mearls, Greg Bilsland and Robert J. Schwalb (June 15, 2010). Monster Manual 3 4th edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 83. ISBN 0786954902.
  4. James Wyatt (October 2001). Oriental Adventures (3rd edition). (Wizards of the Coast), p. 145. ISBN 0-7869-2015-7.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 Doug Stewart (June 1993). Monstrous Manual. (TSR, Inc), p. 100. ISBN 1-5607-6619-0.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 6.7 Gary Gygax (December 1977). Monster Manual, 1st edition. (TSR, Inc), p. 38. ISBN 0-9356-9600-8.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 Wizards RPG Team (2014). Monster Manual 5th edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 123. ISBN 978-0786965614.
  8. Skip Williams, Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook (July 2003). Monster Manual v.3.5. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 98. ISBN 0-7869-2893-X.
  9. Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (August 2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. Edited by Tanis O'Connor. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 198. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  10. Matt Sernett, Erik Scott de Bie, Ari Marmell (August 2011). Neverwinter Campaign Setting. Edited by Tanis O'Connor. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 146–147. ISBN 0-7869-5814-6.
  11. Schlieker Design (2001). Baldur's Gate II: Throne of Bhaal Game Manual , link:[1]. (BioWare).
  12. Richard Baker (1996). Player's Option: Spells & Magic. (TSR, Inc), p. 178. ISBN 0-7869-0394-5.
  13. Mike Mearls, Jeremy Crawford, Christopher Perkins, James Wyatt (2014). Dungeon Master's Guide 5th edition. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 156, 167–168. ISBN 978-0786965622.
  14. Sean K. Reynolds (2002-05-04). Deity Do's and Don'ts (Zipped PDF). Wizards of the Coast. pp. 10–15. Archived from the original on 2016-11-01. Retrieved on 2018-09-08.
  15. Wizards RPG Team (2014). Monster Manual 5th edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 197. ISBN 978-0786965614.
  16. R.A. Salvatore (March 2014). Night of the Hunter. (Wizards of the Coast), pp. 164–165. ISBN 0-7869-6511-8.
  17. Elaine Cunningham (May 1998). Tangled Webs. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 150. ISBN 0-7869-0698-7.
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