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The Zhentarim, (pronounced: /zˈhɛntɑːrɪmz-HENT-ah-rim[4]) previously known as the Black Network,[5] was a mercenary company, and greater mercantile organization in Faerûn,[6] who, over their 200 years of existence, has had a storied history as a cadre of self-serving thieves, spies, assassins and malevolent wizards,[7] who for a time, were indentured by their leaders to serve dark gods Bane[8] and Cyric.[9] Over the decades, the organization experienced several leaps and bounds in terms of successes,[10] but also major misfortune, particularly for their historical strongholds in the Moonsea.[11] As of 1489 DR the Zhentarim was headquartered in the Western Heartlands, at Darkhold Castle, nestled in the valley of the same name.[6]

Aims and goalsEdit

As an extension of the will of the dark wizard Manshoon, the Zhentarim was initially formed as a mercenary company to support his rule over the Moonsea with the aim of spreading that control over all of Faerûn.[12] After he recruited the faithful of Bane, unscrupulous merchants and lesser mages to his cause,[13] they collectively sought to dominate all aspects of the Realms, either by manipulation, outright control or, if they couldn't exert control over something, extinction.[14]

After the mass purge of the Cyricists, known as the Banedeath, and the subsequent partial destruction of Zhentil Keep following the Cyrinishad debacle, the power of the Zhentarim passed to the Bane-worshiping Fzoul Chembryl. He made secret deals with leaders in the Moonsea to erect temples to Iyachtu Xvim, Bane's divine son, within the capitals of their city-states. His aim to extend the will of the Lord of Tyrants across Toril was a dynamic factor behind many of the changes within the organization.[12] He sought to use the Black Network to set the stage for the return of the Lord of Tyrants.[citation needed]

By the late 15th century the goals of the Zhentarim came in line with their original ideals, despite their more benign public perception. By offering the best guards and mercenaries, with the final aim of an iron-fisted monopoly on protection services in the Realms, they sought to make the merchants of Faerûn, and thus the continental economy, completely reliant upon them as an organization. While many of their practices and services they offered were completely legal, they were not above spending a tremendous amount of gold to destroy their competitors and secure future profits to increase their wealth, influence and power.[15]

ActivitiesEdit

In order to achieve their financial goals the Zhentarim agents often dealt in illicit goods and contraband, using their extensive mercantile contacts to move products throughout the Moonsea, neighboring lands and over Faerûn's more hazardous terrains. The types of commodities they dealt in were slaves, poison, drugs and even smokepowder weapons.[16]

As a means of eliminating their competition, the Zhentarim used the Zhentilar army of Zhentil Keep or recruited bands of monstrous humanoids to take down rival caravans, often completing the route under their own banner to earn good faith and new business with merchant groups. They were not above resorting to sabotage, blackmail, arson to outright murder to undermine their mercantile or political opponents. They were even known to purposefully upset the balance of natural beasts, stir up aggressive monster populations within the wild, and even have their mages summon foul monstrosities to threaten isolated towns and villages, in effect forcing the residents to rely upon the protection of the Zhentilar. [16]

OrganizationEdit

Inner Circle

From the early years of the organization until 1369 DR, a few years prior the resurrection of Bane, the Zhentarim's was ruled by the triumvirate of Manshoon, the ultimate authority and Lord of Zhentil Keep, Sememmon, his arcane student who presided over Darkhold, and Fzoul Chembryl, the High Priest of Bane.[17] The Zhentarim was rife with mistrust, even amongst its upper echelons. While Manshoon had a bond of trust with his pupil Sememmon, his relationship with Fzoul was one of mutual disdain shrouded by public respect. While the three shared the same goal of increasing their collective wealth and power, it was at best an uneasy alliance that ultimately fell apart.[10]

  • Manshoon: In addition to his role as the ultimate authority of the Zhentarim, Manshoon held the title of High Lord of Zhentil keep, speaker of the city-state's Council of Lords and had the full backing of the Zhentilar army.[18] He kept close control over the Moonsea Zhentarim, and controlled the other city states such as Hillsfar, the Citadel of the Raven and even Mulmaster,[19] either through manipulation of their leadership or outright force.[citation needed] Prior to the partial destruction of Zhentil Keep, Manshoon moved his operations over to the Citadel,[20] avoiding the chaos brought on by the Cyricists following the Banedeath.[citation needed]
  • Sememmon: The obedient and skillful lieutenant of Manshoon long served as the Lord of Darkhold and unfailingly loyal servant of the Zhentarim.[21] Due to its distance from Manshoon and the Moonsea Zhentarim, the mage-lord only recruited the most loyal and capable agents, about 1000 strong, to the dark keep hidden within the Far Hills.[22] Sememmon's second-in-command was the powerful mage Ashemmi, a former Harper, his consort and true love.[23][24][21]
The Moonsea
Council of Lords: While many councilors of Zhentil Keep chose positions of subservience or acquiescence to the Zhentarim. A few of the Keep's Lords were active and proud members of the Zhentarim.[26]
Church of Bane/Xvim: Working under Fzoul Chembryl, a number of Zhentarim agents came into the organization form the church of Bane. During the years following the Time of Troubles, when Cyricists came into power within Zhentil Keep, many former Banites converted to Xvimism.[citation needed]
Church of Cyric: Following his ascension during the Time of Troubles, Cyric's followers gained prominence within the Zhentarim. Many of the organizations Banites converted to Cyricism and often had conflicts with those who chose to worship Iyachtu Xvim, Bane's divine son.[30]
Caravan masters: Meer, the Head of Caravans for the Zhentarim was overseen by the dark mage Sarthor. He worked with Aghebar who directed individual Zhentarim merchants and Maglor the apothecary. They were served by several caravan masters:Ultan Rathelstan, Krommiar Kethyr, Neth Ilturin, Lhemako Taraskh[17] and (after 1369 DR) Samras Quolcon and Tamek Ilturin.[24]
Diplomats:
  • Miraun: This charming mage served as the "voice" of the Zhentarim, when they were required to parlay and negotiate with foreign heads-of-state.[31]
Military: While not all the members of the Zhentilar or other armies of the Moonsea were members of the Zhentarim, many agents had been installed within their ranks.
Slavers:
Wizards:
  • Thagdal: Manshoon's former apprentice was the head of the Tower of the Art within Zhentil Keep.[24]
  • Eregul: An ally of Manshoon prior to joining the Zhentarim, Eregul sought to supplant Thagdal and earn a seat in Zhentil Keep's Council of Lords.[24]
Auxiliary forces: While not official members of the Zhentarim, their wide-reaching influence gave them access to political powers, military units and groups of skilled individuals.[35]
  • Naug-adar: This cabal of lesser wizards, also known as the "devil dogs", were only granted admittance into the Zhentarim if they demonstrated significant initiative in their duties.[35]
  • Naug-orls: The thieves' guild of Zhentil Keep acted as scouts and reconnaissance agents for the Zhentarim within the Moonsea region. They were led by the master assassin known as Night Fingers.[36]
  • Zhentilar: The High Lord of Zhentil Keep possessed the power of city-state's military, the Zhentilar.[18] During the reign of Manshoon he was served by several commanders including, Battlelord Syal Amandon,[37] and later General Ulgrym,[14] former captain of security within the Keep.[33]
The West
  • Lord Taradril Aumraven led the political and mercantile endeavors under the Lord of Darkhold. The elder wizard believed Sememmon to be a far better leader than Manshoon, as he actually regarded the well being of the citizens of his realm when making decisions.[34]
Assassins: Sememmon was served by group of stealthy killers known as The Three: Mairhe, Sahbonn and Itlur.[24]
Church of Cyric:
Mages: Ashemmi had a number of Zhentarim mages serving as her apprentices. [24]
Military:
Spies:

Post Re-emergence of BaneEdit

After 1370 DR, the Black Network followed a strict linear hierarchy with Fzoul Chembryl serving as the Zhentarim's Grand Tyrant. Only the powerful lords would report directly to him, while lesser officers and agents would only report to their immediate superiors.[2] There were a number of changes within the hierarchy of the Zhentarim. Sememmon exiled himself from Darkhold and many devout followers of Cyric were ousted upon the return of Bane.[citation needed]

The only exception to the inherent power structure of the Zhentarim was Manshoon. While he allowed Fzoul to act as the supreme leader of the Zhentarim, he maintained command over any of its agents or resources to further its goals or his own endeavors.[2]

Moonsea

A number of the leaders of the Moonsea city-states either joined the Zhentarim or were otherwise manipulated into serving the organization:

Promotions
  • Scyllua Darkhope: The Zhent noble, and cousin of Teldorn Darkhope of Mintar, ascended to Castellan and Captain of the Guard of Zhentil Keep, reporting directly to Lord Chembryl.[2] She would go on to become the Commander of Zhentilar some time later[citation needed]
  • The beholder Xulla became the Caravan Lord of the Zhentarim.[16][42]
  • Kandar Milinal became the Lord of the Citadel of the Raven.[2] He was served by Cvaal Daoran, leader of the Brothers of the Black Fist.[16]
  • Dhamir Ercals, one of the few remaining high priests of Cyric, and the Pereghost, were promoted to co-rulers of Darkhold. Despite their shared devotion to Cyric, they had mutual disdain for one another.[16]
  • Kara Chermosk, a former Zhent soldier who regularly accompanied caravans traversing the Black Road through the Anauroch desert,[43] was promoted to commander of the Tethyamar Fortress.[16]
  • Lady Alicia became the head of the Citadel of the Ravens' wizards following the destruction of Zhentil Keep.[34]
  • Eregul left the Keep for Darkhold, where he became head of the wizards within the dark tower.[24]

RelationshipsEdit

AlliesEdit

The Zhentarim had few allies, in comparison to their foes, but they were highly valued for their strategic value. The roster of these supporters were constantly changing along with interests and powers of the Zhentarim.[44]

  • Waterdeep: Unbeknownst to many, the Zhentarim had a tenuous peace with Khelben "Blackstaff" Arunsun of Waterdeep during the mid 14th century DR, thanks to Fzoul Chembryl. Khelben "Blackstaff" exchanged certain information to Fzoul in exchange for an assurance that the Black Network would not expand their influence west of the Thunder Peaks for 30 years. This bargain led to a division between the Harpers and Khelben's independent-operating Moonstars.[3]

FoesEdit

Over the years the Zhentarim drew the ire and hostility of a great number of peoples and organizations.[50] They opposed any group they perceived as a threat to their interests to grow their trade and influence across Faerûn, including the Iron Throne of the Sword Coast, the Rundeen of Calimshan and the fanatical Cult of the Dragon.[3]

  • Harpers: Due to their diametrically opposed world views, the Harpers have been at odds with the Zhentarim since they became aware of the network's existence. Many of the highest-ranking members of the Harpers, such as Elminster Aumar, and several of the Seven Sisters had sizable bounties placed upon their heads by the Black Network.[3]
  • Knights of the North: This group of resistance fighters was formed in 1355 DR after Zhentil Keep betrayed the allied forces of the Moonsea by violently seizing the Citadel of the Raven. Following the death of Commander Galauntar Hawkhelm, his fellow Ravenar soldiers banded together and launched a guerrilla campaign against Zhent holdings and Zhentarim operations within the Moonsea.[51]

HistoryEdit

ZhentarimSymbol

An early Zhentarim symbol.

FoundingEdit

The Zhentarim was founded in 1261 DR by the power-hungry wizard Manshoon, the lord of Zhentil Keep, as tool for his ambitions of expanding his realm of control.[2] He was soon joined by the Baneite cleric Fzoul Chembryl, in 1263 DR, who broke away from the orthodox church in Mulmaster, bringing with him a a small army of his fellow priests into the lesser ranks of the Zhentarim. He then disposed of the high-ranking priests within Zhentil Keep and converted the city's lesser clergy to the worship of Bane.[13][52]Paranoid even in the early years of their alliance, Manshoon offset the possible threat of Fzoul's influence by concocting a plan with the beholder Xantriph. They had the Banite priests confess their sins and swear fealty to Manshoon alone. Xantriph's lair, the floating Temple in the Sky, became an outpost for Zhentilar troops and Banite priests in former Teshendale.[13][53]

Manshoon planned on capturing the Citadel of the Raven during the first days of the Zhentarim, though they were not powerful enough as an organization to openly attack a city of the Moonsea. While it was openly discussed for years, many senior members of the Zhentarim advocated against assaulting the city, fearful of losing their investments that funded the Black Network.[54] Putting that scheme on hold, they greatly strengthened their economic holdings during the Moonsea War of 1306 DR. The allied forces of Zhentil Keep, Hillsfar, Melvaunt, Phlan and Sembia untied together to defeat the city-state of Mulmaster.[55]

GrowthEdit

In 1312 DR, Manshoon seized the fortress of Darkhold from the Lich-Queen Varalla in order to extend his control into the Western Heartlands.[56] Four years later they invaded and seized Teshendale in 1336 DR.[57]

With the Zhentarim's successes with the Darkhold, Teshendale and Hillsfar, they had the entire Tesh Valley and Voonlar under their influence.[citation needed] They then conquered and installed own rulers in Daggerdale in 1336 DR.[58] Manshoon consolidated his rule over all Zhent lands and declared himself the High Lord of Zhentil Keep the following year. These actions caused the nations of the Moonsea to begin to grow wary of the Zhentarim and Zhentil Keep.[59]

Also that year, Manshoon granted the previously-occupied Yûlash their independence, and maneuvered this act of "good will" to call a meeting of the rulers of the Moonsea in the neutral town of Elmwood. He called for a garrison to be established at the Citadel of the Raven to protect the greater Moonsea from a horde of orcs that was stirring further north. He "graciously" offered to move the recently-evicted Zhentilar soldiers from Yûlash to the city,[60] though this was merely part of a long-term scheme to take over the city.[54]

The Zhentarim saw significant losses in the next few years when Jyordhan, puppet ruler of Shadowdale, was assassinated by Khelben Arunsun,[61] Xantriph was killed by the Knights of Myth Drannor[62] and Malyk, the puppet ruler of Daggerdale, was killed by Randal Morn, leading to all-out civil war.[63]

Despite their losses, the time was right in 1355 DR for the Zhentarim strike against their former allies in the Citadel of the Raven. They had their agents planted within the city kill as many as their could, using poison and magic. The orcs and Zhentilar poured into the city and claimed it for the Zhentarim. One of the few survivors within the Citadel was the mortally-wounded Galauntar Hawkhelm, whose eventual death would lead to the formation of the Knights of the North.[54] He installed Kandar Milinal as the ruler of the city. This eventually led to civil war in the Zhent city of Yûlash.[citation needed]

BanedeathEdit

During the Time of Troubles, Bane arrived in the Black Altar,[64] he ordered the his devoted priest Fzoul Chembryl and Manshoon's apprentice Sememmon to work together, much to their mutual displeasure,[10] in an assault of Twisted Tower of Ashaba in Shadowdale so that he could could enter Morningdawn Hall. After the destruction of the Dark God's avatar, the newly-ascended deity Cyric, who took on his divine portfolio, became the focus of worship for a great number of the members of the Zhentarim. Fzoul Chembryl and a few others maintained their faith, while some others converted to the veneration of Iyachtu Xvim, Bane's divine son.[64]

The conflict between the opposing faiths embedded within the Zhentarim culminated in an event known as the Banedeath which began on Marpenoth 30, 1361 DR. Xeno Mirrormane, [64] began a purge of all the remaining Banites within Zhentil Keep, eventually killing his brother and sparing none except for Fzoul Chembryl, due to his "special relationship" with Cyric. While the aid of the church of Cyric allowed Zhentil Keep to grow in power over the next few years,[65] Manshoon realized that Cyric was no replacement for the calculating cunning and patience of Bane.[66]

In a period of six months in 1366 DR, Manshoon quietly and discreetly shifted resources and personnel from Zhentil Keep to the Citadel of the Raven, distrustful of the impulsive Cyric and his inept clergy members. Fzoul Chembryl saw these actions and remained neutral, still bitter from his loss of influence as the High Priest of Bane.[66]

CyrinishadEdit

Cyric was eventually undermined by a divine conspiracy involving High Lord Fzoul. The larger northern half of Zhentil Keep was left in ruins as a result. Some 1,500 Zhentilar and Zhentarim, many of whom were high-ranking officers, and all the orc troops fled the city.[67] Fzoul and Lord Orgauth defeated Manshoon and Sememmon, killing Manshoon in 1370 DR.[citation needed]
New Zhentarim Symbol

Symbol of the Zhentarim under Fzoul

Manshoon WarsEdit

Manshoon lived on through clone bodies. Of these, one returned to the Zhentarim, conceded all leadership to Fzoul, and worked as an agent. When Bane was resurrected in 1372 DR, Fzoul became an expansionist, but was threatened by the reemergence of Myth Drannor. His paranoia lead him to attack Myth Drannor and Shadowdale, which he temporarily controlled. A Zhent named Karne attempted to take over the Onyx Tower, but the plan ultimately failed. Fzoul engaged in a hopeless alliance with the phaerimm, which enraged the Shadovar. The Netherese destroyed Zhentil Keep and the Citadel of the Raven, killing both Fzoul and the final clone of Manshoon, leaving only Darkhold left.[citation needed]

This section is a stub. You can help us by expanding it.


15th centuryEdit

The Zhentarim was again taken over by the forces of Cyric, who engaged in battle with the forces of Bane. In 1420 DR, an evil mage named Rezlus took over the Banites and attempted to conquer Daggerdale. He failed and the Banites fell with only the forces of Cyric remaining.[68]

By 1434 DR, the final Manshoon clone raised an army of undead and took refuge in the citadel of Stormwatch. From there, he retook the Zhentarim, with only Darkhold and Stormwatch as their remaining bases of operations. The Zhentarim were reduced to nothing more than mercenaries who hoped to gain former glory and took any contract as long as it paid well.[citation needed]
5e Zhentarim badge

15th century symbol

Post Second SunderingEdit

In the year 1489 DR the Zhentarim sent an agent, the gnome assassin Jamna Gleamsilver, to investigate the recent activities of the Cult of the Dragon,[69] as they had been growing in power rather rapidly. They allied with several other factions, including those which would otherwise be enemies, to rise up against the Cult and Red Wizards' attempts to free the dragon god Tiamat.[70][page needed]

Areas of ActivityEdit

The Moonsea
  • Zhentil Keep: This city-fortress main base of operation for the Zhentarim.[71]
  • Citadel of the Raven: This isolated stronghold was a chain of interconnected fortresses straddling the Dragonspine Mountains. It was intended to stop any possible invasions from either The Ride or Thar.[72] The Zhentarim stole it from the other Moonsea powers in 1355 DR,[51] some 15 years before Manshoon made it the stronghold from which he would pursue his arcane interests.[73]
  • Melvaunt: Seemingly always at war with Zhentil Keep, Mulmaster was infiltrated by agents of the Zhentarim, in an attempt to take over their slave trade,[47] including Lyran Nanther who was almost able to attain lordship of the city-state with the pendant of Ashaba.[74]
  • Mulmaster - This former enemy became an ally to the Zhentarim after the High Blade was secretly replaced by his twin brother in 1368 DR.[75]
  • Phlan - Another long-time foe, the settlement was finally conquered in 1380 DR.[76]
  • Yûlash - The Zhentarim took this city in a long and bloody civil war, where they pitted their forces against those of Hillsfar.[citation needed]
Western Heartlands
  • Darkhold: The castle-keep of Darkhold and the surrounding Far Hills were conquered by the Zhentarim in 1312 DR.[77] The stronghold was the seat of power for the group in the west, ruled by the mage Sememmon until Bane's resurection. It had strong ties to Cyricists, fitting as its two ruling lords were the enigmatic Pereghost[78] and the High Priest of the Black Sun, Dhamir Ercals.[24] In the following century, following the Spellplague, Darkhold would serve as headquarters for the restructured Zhentarim, led by the Pereghost.[6]
This section is a stub. You can help us by expanding it.


The Dalelands
Other regions
  • The North: It was believed the organization sent some of its older members to the frontier nations of The North, such as the Silver Marches, to act under the guise of families who bought up land to live a peaceful life as homesteaders until needed by their Zhentarim Lords.[citation needed]

TerminologyEdit

  • Zhent: A person from Zhentil Keep. Not all Zhents were members of the Zhentarim.[93]
  • Zhentarim: The greater organization itself; members of the organization, either singular or plural.[93]
  • Zhentilar: The military of Zhentil Keep, used to distinguish them from members of the Zhentarim.[93][94]
  • Zhentish: A grammatically incorrect term that would bring derision on the user, even in lands unfriendly to Zhents.[citation needed]

AppendixEdit

AppearancesEdit

Adventures
Video games

Further ReadingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. James Butler, Elizabeth T. Danforth, Jean Rabe (September 1994). “Anauroch”. In Karen S. Boomgarden ed. Elminster's Ecologies (TSR, Inc), p. 3. ISBN 1-5607-6917-3.
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 2.11 Sean K. Reynolds, Jason Carl (November 2001). Lords of Darkness. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 96. ISBN 0-7869-1989-2.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Sean K. Reynolds, Jason Carl (November 2001). Lords of Darkness. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 98. ISBN 0-7869-1989-2.
  4. Jeff Grubb, Ed Greenwood and Karen S. Martin (1987). Forgotten Realms Campaign Set (Cyclopedia of the Realms). (TSR, Inc), p. 92. ISBN 0-8803-8472-7.
  5. Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 281. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 Kim Mohan ed. (2015). Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 78. ISBN 978-0786965809.
  7. Kim Mohan ed. (2015). Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 77. ISBN 978-0786965809.
  8. Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 282. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  9. Steven E. Schend, Sean K. Reynolds and Eric L. Boyd (June 2000). Cloak & Dagger. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 9. ISBN 0-7869-1627-3.
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 Kevin Melka and John Terra (April 1995). Ruins of Zhentil Keep (Campaign Book). (TSR, Inc), p. 34. ISBN 0-7869-0109-8.
  11. Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 151. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  12. 12.0 12.1 Steven E. Schend, Sean K. Reynolds and Eric L. Boyd (June 2000). Cloak & Dagger. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 32. ISBN 0-7869-1627-3.
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 Kevin Melka and John Terra (April 1995). Ruins of Zhentil Keep (Campaign Book). (TSR, Inc), p. 15. ISBN 0-7869-0109-8.
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 Steven E. Schend, Sean K. Reynolds and Eric L. Boyd (June 2000). Cloak & Dagger. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 36. ISBN 0-7869-1627-3.
  15. Wizards of the Coast (2018). Factions: Zhentarim. Factions. Wizards of the Coast. Retrieved on 2018-11-02.
  16. 16.0 16.1 16.2 16.3 16.4 16.5 16.6 Sean K. Reynolds, Jason Carl (November 2001). Lords of Darkness. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 97. ISBN 0-7869-1989-2.
  17. 17.0 17.1 17.2 17.3 Kevin Melka and John Terra (April 1995). Ruins of Zhentil Keep (Campaign Book). (TSR, Inc), p. 32. ISBN 0-7869-0109-8.
  18. 18.0 18.1 Kevin Melka and John Terra (April 1995). Ruins of Zhentil Keep (Campaign Book). (TSR, Inc), p. 62. ISBN 0-7869-0109-8.
  19. 19.0 19.1 Kevin Melka and John Terra (April 1995). Ruins of Zhentil Keep (Campaign Book). (TSR, Inc), p. 42. ISBN 0-7869-0109-8.
  20. Kevin Melka and John Terra (April 1995). Ruins of Zhentil Keep (Campaign Book). (TSR, Inc), p. 30. ISBN 0-7869-0109-8.
  21. 21.0 21.1 Ed Greenwood, Sean K. Reynolds, Skip Williams, Rob Heinsoo (June 2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting 3rd edition. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 229. ISBN 0-7869-1836-5.
  22. Kevin Melka and John Terra (April 1995). Ruins of Zhentil Keep (Campaign Book). (TSR, Inc), p. 35. ISBN 0-7869-0109-8.
  23. George Krashos (July 2007). “Volo's Guide: Renegades of Darkhold”. In Erik Mona ed. Dragon #357 (Paizo Publishing, LLC), p. 74.
  24. 24.00 24.01 24.02 24.03 24.04 24.05 24.06 24.07 24.08 24.09 24.10 24.11 24.12 24.13 24.14 24.15 24.16 24.17 24.18 24.19 Steven E. Schend, Sean K. Reynolds and Eric L. Boyd (June 2000). Cloak & Dagger. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 37. ISBN 0-7869-1627-3.
  25. Bruce R. Cordell, Ed Greenwood, Chris Sims (August 2008). Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 81. ISBN 978-0-7869-4924-3.
  26. Steven E. Schend, Sean K. Reynolds and Eric L. Boyd (June 2000). Cloak & Dagger. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 6. ISBN 0-7869-1627-3.
  27. Kevin Melka and John Terra (April 1995). Ruins of Zhentil Keep (Campaign Book). (TSR, Inc), p. 63. ISBN 0-7869-0109-8.
  28. Jeff Grubb and Ed Greenwood (1990). Forgotten Realms Adventures. (TSR, Inc), p. 120. ISBN 0-8803-8828-5.
  29. John Terra (February 1995). The Moonsea (Reference Guide). (TSR, Inc), p. 16. ISBN 978-0786900923.
  30. Steven E. Schend, Sean K. Reynolds and Eric L. Boyd (June 2000). Cloak & Dagger. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 9. ISBN 0-7869-1627-3.
  31. Steven E. Schend, Sean K. Reynolds and Eric L. Boyd (June 2000). Cloak & Dagger. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 39. ISBN 0-7869-1627-3.
  32. Jeff Grubb, Ed Greenwood and Karen S. Martin (1987). Forgotten Realms Campaign Set (DM's Sourcebook of the Realms). (TSR, Inc), p. 23. ISBN 0-8803-8472-7.
  33. 33.0 33.1 Kevin Melka and John Terra (April 1995). Ruins of Zhentil Keep (Campaign Book). (TSR, Inc), p. 94. ISBN 0-7869-0109-8.
  34. 34.0 34.1 34.2 34.3 34.4 Steven E. Schend, Sean K. Reynolds and Eric L. Boyd (June 2000). Cloak & Dagger. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 36. ISBN 0-7869-1627-3.
  35. 35.0 35.1 Kevin Melka and John Terra (April 1995). Ruins of Zhentil Keep (Campaign Book). (TSR, Inc), p. 59. ISBN 0-7869-0109-8.
  36. Kevin Melka and John Terra (April 1995). Ruins of Zhentil Keep (Campaign Book). (TSR, Inc), p. 60. ISBN 0-7869-0109-8.
  37. Kevin Melka and John Terra (April 1995). Ruins of Zhentil Keep (Campaign Book). (TSR, Inc), p. 61. ISBN 0-7869-0109-8.
  38. Steven E. Schend, Sean K. Reynolds and Eric L. Boyd (June 2000). Cloak & Dagger. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 38. ISBN 0-7869-1627-3.
  39. Thomas M. Reid, Sean K. Reynolds, Darrin Drader, Wil Upchurch (June 2006). Mysteries of the Moonsea. (Wizards of the Coast), p. 94. ISBN 0-7869-3915-X.
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